Calluses

Corns and calluses are thick, hardened layers of skin that develop on feet, toes, and hands.  Although formed as the body’s natural response to constant friction and pressure, corns and calluses can become unsightly and painful.

If a corn or callus is causing you discomfort, the best first aid remedy is to find a way to eliminate the friction or pressure that is causing your skin to harden.

Corns, for example, are often caused by wearing the wrong type of shoes. When shoes are too tight or have high heels, they put pressure on specific areas of your foot. When shoes are too loose, your foot will repeatedly slide around and rub against the shoe. Your foot can also rub against a stitch or seam inside of a certain kind of shoe.

Buying shoes that fit comfortably and snugly, will help current corns heal, and prevent new ones from forming. It is also important to wear socks that fit properly, even with sandals. Wearing shoes and sandals without socks causes friction on your feet that can lead to blisters and corns.

Calluses on your hands often result from constantly gripping tools when working.  Whether on the job, in the garden, or around your home: wear protective gloves to help prevent calluses from forming.

If you have diabetes or poor circulation, or your corn or callus is very painful and inflamed, see your doctor before self-treating.  For people with diabetes, any minor foot injury could lead to an infected open sore, or develop into a foot ulcer that is difficult to heal.  Remember, it is always wise to seek medical attention if you believe you have an infection.

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